As to riders. Since FDR recycles existing materials,

As
the state’s infrastructure ages, construction agencies at all levels are tasked
with maintaining and rehabilitating their infrastructure. As budgets are decreasing,
construction costs are increasing; it is becoming costlier to completely remove
and replace existing pavements. In Addison, as feasible construction practices
come to the beginning, facilities want to recapitalize their investments in
decades-old pavements by reusing existing materials on site in a cost-efficient
manner. Sustainable engineering technologies in pavement rehabilitation, such
as full-depth reclamation (FDR), could be the solution for agencies in their hunt
to provide taxpayers with good -quality infrastructure while being good purser
of public funds. Full-depth reclamation of asphalt pavement, is a reestablishment
method that involves recycling an existing asphalt pavement and its underlying
layer(s) into a new base layer.

Construction
of FDR has less impact on the locality than remove-and-replace construction methods.
Basically, completed portions of the FDR base can be opened almost immediately
to local traffic as soon as the curing material is not affected. This is a mostly
favors to urban areas where residential and commercial roadway access is
critical during construction. In addition to improved staging, reclaiming
in-place materials reduces the overall construction schedule, helping to
minimize inconvenience to riders.

Since
FDR recycles existing materials, there is less truck traffic to haul away
existing materials and import new materials to the construction site. Not only
does this improve safety and reduce energy consumption but it also has less
impact on adjacent streets that may otherwise be damaged due to heavy equipment
during construction.

Another
benefit of FDR is that an existing roadway can be widened with a uniform base
compared with other widening methods that do not involve reclamation. Full
depth reclamation can be used to widen roadways while at the same time blending
the underlying poorer quality subgrades with the existing pavement and cement
to produce a new uniform base layer. Agencies have been pleased with the
success of this method because they are able to expand their existing roadways
at a fraction of the cost of alternative road construction methods. As reclamation
could eliminate labor costs, trucking and off-site processing fees, the practice
will drastically impact the project costs. Reliant on-site size and conditions,
using full depth reclamation as opposed to removal and replacement could
generate a cost savings of over half cost around 50%.

Despite
there are significant advantages to including FDR into a roadway rehabilitation
project, certain aspects of the roadway project must be considered. If there
are areas with drainage problems such as saturated subgrade or inadequate
drainage systems to divert water away from the pavement structure, FDR alone
will not solve this issue. The project should include measures. Modern
pulverizing equipment can exceed 18 inches in depth and, as with all pavement
reconstruction methods, the elevation of existing utilities should be checked
and documented before selecting FDR as the restoration method. Full-depth
reclamation is not the solution for all pavement distresses. We should consider
the condition of existing pavement and the reason for the distress. For
pavements with adequate subgrades and bases and existing asphalt pavement in
fair or better condition (minor surface cracking), the need for FDR is justified
As the state’s infrastructure ages, construction agencies at all levels are
tasked with maintaining and rehabilitating their infrastructure. As budgets are
decreasing, construction costs are increasing; it is becoming costlier to
completely remove and replace existing pavements. In Addison, as feasible
construction practices come to the beginning, facilities want to recapitalize
their investments in decades-old pavements by reusing existing materials on
site in a cost-efficient manner. Sustainable engineering technologies in
pavement rehabilitation, such as full-depth reclamation (FDR), could be the solution
for agencies in their hunt to provide taxpayers with good -quality
infrastructure while being good purser of public funds. Full-depth reclamation
of asphalt pavement, is a reestablishment method that involves recycling an
existing asphalt pavement and its underlying layer(s) into a new base layer.

Construction
of FDR has less impact on the locality than remove-and-replace construction methods.
Basically, completed portions of the FDR base can be opened almost immediately
to local traffic as soon as the curing material is not affected. This is a mostly
favors to urban areas where residential and commercial roadway access is
critical during construction. In addition to improved staging, reclaiming
in-place materials reduces the overall construction schedule, helping to
minimize inconvenience to riders.

Since
FDR recycles existing materials, there is less truck traffic to haul away
existing materials and import new materials to the construction site. Not only
does this improve safety and reduce energy consumption but it also has less
impact on adjacent streets that may otherwise be damaged due to heavy equipment
during construction.

Another
benefit of FDR is that an existing roadway can be widened with a uniform base
compared with other widening methods that do not involve reclamation. Full
depth reclamation can be used to widen roadways while at the same time blending
the underlying poorer quality subgrades with the existing pavement and cement
to produce a new uniform base layer. Agencies have been pleased with the
success of this method because they are able to expand their existing roadways
at a fraction of the cost of alternative road construction methods. As reclamation
could eliminate labor costs, trucking and off-site processing fees, the practice
will drastically impact the project costs. Reliant on-site size and conditions,
using full depth reclamation as opposed to removal and replacement could
generate a cost savings of over half cost around 50%.

Despite
there are significant advantages to including FDR into a roadway rehabilitation
project, certain aspects of the roadway project must be considered. If there
are areas with drainage problems such as saturated subgrade or inadequate
drainage systems to divert water away from the pavement structure, FDR alone
will not solve this issue. The project should include measures. Modern
pulverizing equipment can exceed 18 inches in depth and, as with all pavement
reconstruction methods, the elevation of existing utilities should be checked
and documented before selecting FDR as the restoration method. Full-depth
reclamation is not the solution for all pavement distresses. We should consider
the condition of existing pavement and the reason for the distress. For
pavements with adequate subgrades and bases and existing

asphalt pavement in fair or better condition (minor
surface cracking), the need for FDR is

when
increased structural capacity is needed to meet future loading conditions.

 

Finally, we can conclude that,
Like all reconstruction methods, the FDR process requires an engineering
pavement evaluation as a part of project selection, as well as implementation
of established quality control practices during construction. Full-depth reclamation is a valuable and useful construction
method help to improve the condition of existing sites at a reasonable cost, an
expedited schedule, and a reduced impact to the environment as compared to full
surface replacement.