Dr. tells him that he is damned to

Dr. Faustus makeshis arrangement with lucifer for the reason that his frustrations with the restrictionsof human science, reason, understanding, and knowledge. An individual could claim,however, that Dr.

Faustus did not actually provide science, reason,understanding and knowledge with the opportunity to be useful. In fact, Dr.Faustus’s topmost character imperfection is that he wants the restrictions ofknowledge and humanity to be lengthened outside of its capacity.

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Marlowe’s playis a morality tale about wanting more than what is given to usThe way Faustussees it, the Bible tells him that he is damned to hell no matter what he does.He shows us how he feels when he says “Why then belike we must sin, and soconsequently die. Ay, we must die an everlasting death. What doctrine call youthis? Che sara, sara: What will be, shall be? Divinity, adieu!” (Scene 1.44-48) In a weird way, it makes sense that he rejects the study of theology. Itwould be worthless if, no matter how much you research it, the ideas andbeliefs can’t purchase you a ticket to heaven. However unfinished it is,Faustus’s explanation of these Bible verses comes close to showing some form ofpredestination; that a man’s fate as saved or damned is set in stone longbefore he’s even born. The only alteration is that here, Faustus doesn’t reflectanyone having the opportunity to be saved.

Can Faustus besaved, or has his life been set the moment he decided to get rid of theologyfor the possibilities magic brought upon him? The second scholar is very optimistic,yet the first scholar took the perspective that was stated by lucifer:Faustus’s redemption vessel has set out to sea. “2 Scholar: Where he a stranger, and notallied to me, yet should I grieve for him. But come, let us go and inform therector, and see if he by his grave counsel can reclaim him. 1 Scholar: O but Ifear me nothing can reclaim him. 2 Scholar: Yet let us try what we can do” (Scene2 31-35)It’s hard to determine whetherFaustus’s life was predestined from that point on to be damned or not. I feelas though he still had plenty of opportunities to repent and save himself fromthis terrible future. Following the first scholars’ optimism, Faustus couldhave been saved. This would also beg the question to whether there is a pointof no return.

Can humans live a life of sin and be saved before they die, or dothey pass their time to be saved.