In a disconnection between African slaves and free

In the Sugar Islands on the so-called island of Hispaniola, which today is shared by both Haiti and The Dominican Republic, was initially populated by a native group called the Tino. The colonizer, Christopher Columbus, landed on the island on behalf of his Spanish funders and named the island Isla Espanola. However, Spain’s control over its territory did not last long, by that time the indigenous Tino were critically affected by sickness and genocide, conflicts between Spain and France over land would rise until 1697 when Spain ceded one-third of the island to the French. Although the conflict between the two countries was a disaster, Spain and France realized that they had a much bigger problem, they did not have plantation workers. Plantation owners could not use natives or indentured servants because they were either too expensive to get or too weak to do hard labor. Therefore, both of the countries had to find a laborer who was strong enough to handle hard work. After a couple of months, France and Spain both found the answers to their problems, African slaves. Unlike Spain, who barely used their African slaves, France took this slavery idea and decided to advance it into something more profitable, the Transatlantic Slave Trade. Initially, the Caribbean´s job was to train all of the newly enslaved Africans. This particular role made the Caribbean develop a strict and harsh treatment of slaves. It also allowed the sugar islands to become prosperous. However, as time progressed on, the role of the Caribbean began to change. Plantation owners soon realized that they could make more money keeping their slaves instead of selling them. So, the plantation masters started to use the trained, enslaved African laborers on their plantations. Therefore, by enslaving African citizens from their homelands, slave owners extinguished the liberties of future African people in The Sugar Islands. Tormented by labor and abhorrent discriminations created a disconnection between African slaves and free citizens. However, successful slave revolts influenced governmental officials to loosen the constricted authority over African laborers.