March his father who was from Kenya and

March
18, 2008; the day one of the greatest speeches in history was delivered by the
44th President of the United States and former US Senator, Barack
Obama. Obamas speech “A More Perfect Union” touched upon racial history and
tensions, race and equality, white privilege and more in the United States. This speech also showed that Obama
has some great things he wants to change in our country, including economic
factors, education, and healthcare. The controversy of his race in the election
playing a key role on which his supporters are was a bit disturbing to me. I
believe that American citizens really need to come together and put aside
appearances and figure out who would be the best leader for our country. In his
speech, Obama indicates three particular rhetorical strategies to help his
general argument that unity is obligatory in this nation for a result of racial
fairness. Initially, he opens with ethics and his personal and historical
background, at that point offers to encounters through different examples,
lastly utilizes his interests to his appeals to propose changes for black and
white Americans. To many, this speech was both a rhetorical and political
turning point in the 2008 presidential campaign.

Obama starts his discourse with his
own and America’s racial history to feature the significance of solidarity in
reckoning of his election. With his unique background Obama
was born to his father who was from Kenya and his mother who was from Kansas. There was a lot of criticism about his
supporters supporting him purely because of his race. “I am the son of a black
man from Kenya and a white woman from Kansas. I was raised with the help of a
white grandfather… I have brothers, sisters, nieces, nephews, uncles and
cousins, of every race and every hue.” (Obama, 614). Through this diversity and
detailing his own American story, he establishes his own credibility on the
subject and places himself into a unique category which no prior President or
candidate can replicate. Unfortunately race does play a role in the economical
factor in the U.S. Obama talks about the lack of economic opportunity among
black men and them not being able to provide for their families and there’s
also the lack of services in so many urban black neighborhoods, such as parks
for kids to play in, police services, and regular garbage pick-up. Seeing how
much the economy was affected, Obama has made a lot of changes. Those changes
include, the end of the 2008 recession, an $858 billion tax cut, reduction of
carbon emissions, nuclear agreement with Iran, and one of the world’s largest
trade agreement. (Amadeo)

Obama appeals to a combination of experiences by
presenting controversial historical subjects such as slavery and segregation
with relating them to current stories involving racial discrimination and
prejudice and racism.  “Segregated
schools were, and are, inferior schools: we still haven’t fixed them, fifty
years after Brown v. Board of Education, and the inferior education they
provided, then and now, helps explain the pervasive achievement gap between
todays black and white students.” (Obama, 618). By painting a case of racial
inequality – and also its long haul impacts – Obama effectively offers to the
feelings of his audience (the whole United States population) to underscore the
requirement for racial unity in America. Relating that to modern day and being
educated in a well- known University, quality education was very important to
him. “This time we want to
reject the cynicism that tells us that these kids can’t learn; that those kids
who don’t look like us are somebody else’s problem. The children of America are
not those kids, they are our kids, and we 
will not let them fall behind in a 21stcentury economy.” (Obama, 622). To outline the racial disparity in
America, Obama advances to encounters as he plays off the emotions of his
audience to additionally call for unity on the eve of his election. Since being
elected as President, Obama has changed a lot regarding the education system.

For example, in 2014 there was a $200 million grants across 18 states,
expanding access to high quality preschools to 33, 000 children, not only that
but high school graduations rate hit an all-time high reaching to 83.2%. And
states are not required to evaluate teachers using students test scores.

(Sanchez et al).

Finally, Obama utilizes his solid
interests to legitimate reasoning to recommend, however not compel, methods of
progress for black and whites Americans. One of those changes he wants to make
is in regards to the health care system. “This time we want to talk about how
the lines in the Emergency Room are filled with whites and blacks and Hispanics
who do not have health care; who don’t have the power on their own to overcome
the special interests in Washington, but who can take them on if we do it
together.” (Obama, 622). Shortly after being elected, President Obama did all
the research needed using historical documents, created Obama Care. As of 2010,
Obama Care is a federal law providing affordable health care to the citizens of
the United States. This is the great rhetorical accomplishment of his speech:
Obama uses his appeal to logic to demonstrate the need for change.

One
last main focus in this speech was regarding Reverend Wright; his former pastor. The Reverend spoke
some very controversial words concerning the issue of racism, which created
much unease. Obama was forced to respond. And with great confidence and
rhetoric, he did. Obama responds with saying that his former pastor is a good
man, “As imperfect as he may be, he has been like family to me. He strengthened
my faith, officiated my wedding, and baptized my children.” (Obama, 617). and
that he just has lived and grew up in a time where segregation and the Jim Crow
Laws were very much legal in the U.S. The pastor’s words were inappropriate and
should not have been said, but the pastor does have a right to express his
opinion. Also, everyone is human, no one is perfect, Wright was just expressing
his opinion which got blown up by the media. Obama’s defensive attitude towards
his former pastor showed compassion and loyalty, which to me are very important
for the leader of our nation. Obama’s solution to ending this anger of
diversity and discrimination is to work together and to move past some of the
terrible things that have happened, and take our lives into our own hands and
take responsibility for our own lives. We need to come together as a nation and
improve our economic, schools, and health care.

Obama ends his speech by telling
everyone a story about Ashley Baia. Ashely is a 22-year-old white woman who
organizes their campaigns. One day she was at a round table with people where
they went around telling everyone their story and why they are there. Just like
everyone at the table Ashley had her own problem which she shared. When she
reached to this elderly black man who was sitting there quietly the whole time,
Ashley asks him why he’s there. The elderly black man did not bring up his own
problems nor did he say he was there for Barack Obama, he simply said “I am
here because of Ashley.” But it was that moment between the young white woman
and the elderly black man that they knew “this is where we start” and this
where their union grows stronger.

With the considerable accomplishment of this notable speech, Obama took
remain to new platform in November of that same year, this opportunity to
acknowledge his election as the Leader of the United States. After reading this
speech I must say that President Obama definitely has some great points that
made me really think about our society and how the older generations have
really affected people’s lives
today. I live in an upper middle class society where I have all the tools and
opportunities I need to succeed right in front of me. I am lucky and thankful,
but I know that there are many other people out in our nation who are
struggling just to get by because of what kind of health care and job systems
we have set up. Obama’s solution to help fix our country is take
self-initiative and take our own lives into our own hands and stop waiting for
someone or something to happen in order for things to change. It’s a great
plan, but easier said
than done. The
issue of Obama’s race being a contributing factor to the amount of supporters
that he has gained throughout the election is definitely a little biased, and I
don’t think it’s smart for people to just follow a candidate based solely on
their race or ethnicity. They should follow them because of who they are and
what they believe in, and what they can actually accomplish for this country.

Race will always come into the equation no matter what, but I don’t think that
it should be the major influencing factor on who we choose as our leader. “These people are a part of me. And
they are a part of America, this country that I love.” (Obama, 617). As a president he
tried to accomplish those goals and achieved many more. He has made a great
different in the United States; appreciated by many, that being said, thank you
Barack Obama.