Task crucial to happiness. Duri (1998) mentioned te

                                                                      Task 1.1 PRINCIPLES OF HAOURA Te taha wairua (spirituality)  Durie (1998) mentions teha wairua for faith and greater communication ability. Te taha wairua has been identified as the key needs for health but, unfortunately, health workers have ignored this on large scale. Te taha wairua is not only about religion, although for many people this is a very imperative part of their Spirituality. It is assumed that if  there is no mental consciousness, the individual can be considered as Lack of health, more susceptible to illness. Wairua may also explore the relationship with the Environment, between people or heritage. The breakdown of this relationship  in the body is not healthy for lack of personal identity. The challenge for many health practitioners is in knowing how to ask about this area in a meaningful manner. Participating in M?ori cultural responsiveness training will assist with this learning Te taha hinengaro (thoughts / feelings) Te taha hinengaro refers to thoughts, feelings and behaviors that are crucial to happiness. Duri (1998) mentioned te taha hinengaro as the ability to communicate, think and feel. Maoris thinking can be described as being holistic. Maori do not think on an individual basis. The Larger picture meet the overall needs of individuals at the same time retain the essence. The optimistic attitude about many Maori is the relationship. For the Maori emotional exchange is equally important and has more meanings than any other exchanges. For example, if Maori show their feelings rather than talk about their feelings, this is what is considered health. kuia can observe this example in many typical tangihanga (funerals), By crying, expressing sadness, not speaking Practitioners need to be aware of different cultures values ??and beliefs about health and personal as well as wh?nau Respect and openness to these different beliefs and values ??will ensure meaningfulness Contact and connection can occur Practitioners may need to change their focus when considering long-term care personal management to wh?nau self-management Te taha tinana (Physical) Te taha tinana refers to the ability to be healthy and develop (Durie, 1998). The physical area is the most familiar part of the health sector. But for Maori people Happiness and spirit, emotion and family well-being are intertwined. One of the links between te taha wairua and te taha tinana that serve Maori bodies and things Related to it is Tapu. The concept of tower chart (meaning sacred) is the foundation of law and order and the health of traditional Maori society (Durie, 1977). The traditional Maori viewpoint is that people are considered sick when personal violation of Tapu takes place. Even today, the concept of Tapu may be a pivotal point to understand Maori disease. Inter-relationship about Tapu and good health is another example  Te taha wh?nau (family / connection) Te taha wh?nau refers to family happiness.  Wh?nau is the main support system for providing care, Not only physically but also culturally, mentally and emotionally. It’s about Maori to Expand relations among family members. Keeping the family interpersonal relationships are vital part of life and care for the elderly is the most important. In short that role and responsibility, everyone has a place and a role to fulfill themselves in the wh?nau. Family contributes to a person’s happiness, most importantly, a person’s identity. The independence of wh?nau and not from wh?nau is a Maori health goal. The boundaries between personal and family identity are often vague (Durie, 1994). It is traditional at the onset of a disease (Durie, 1977) and should be considered as such the entire patient management. Wh?nau is recognized as the foundation of Maori society. As the main source of power, support, security and identity, which play an imperative role in Maori happiness Collectively “Under normal circumstances, this will be the normal creator of the patients. Environmental conditions that have the greatest impact on one’s health “(Durie & Kingi,1997). The challenge for practitioners will be to support a shift from personal that is a focus of attention Maori and non-Maori. For many Maori people, certain parts of the body are also considered Tower charts, such as the head, however, have existed in many cases in the medical community ignore. Te taha tinana can also refer to the physical environment. Socio-economic factors such as Employment, housing and income are other factors that affect the overall welfare of Maori. APA Ref: http://www.centralpho.org.nz   Te taha whenua the placenta  M?ori means whenua, which means the placenta. All life is observed as being hatched from the womb of Papat??nuku. The land that appears on the water is the placenta in her womb. They float and form the island. From another panoramic view, whole life takes place within the womb of the world. In that womb, preparing for a new galaxy. Maoris are children within the womb of the world and will soon emerge in other real life.  Tangata whenua Tangata – Of course, people on these lands are those who have potency in somewhere. It is based on the depth of their relationship with that place, from their birth and the birth of their ancestors.                                           Task 1.2  Whakapapa Whakapapa is defined as a lineage “of all living creatures from the god to the present” Because all creatures, comprise rocks and mountains, are thought to have whakapapa , It is furtherly defined as “the basis for organizing knowledge in the creation and improvement  of all things” Therefore, “Whakapapa” also means deep connection with the roots of land and ancestors. In order to trace his “whakapapa,” it is necessary to determine where the ancestral heritage begins; “You can not go further.” “Whakapapa connects all people to the sea, air and land, and to the universe. Therefore, the obligation of whanaungatanga extends to the material world and to all the world”  Although some home and community health agencies may need to use whakapapa as part of their client assessment, it is often better if whakapapa is voluntarily disclosed. Usually the client’s whakapapa details are not required because enough information is available through their iwi identification. Conditions that may require whakapapa include adoption cases or circumstances where whakapapa details may be beneficial to the client’s health and well-being.Whakapapa as well considered to be one of the innermost towers of a person. “Sharing whakapapa can define obligations … and gain the trust of participants”. In addition, Tapp’s concept still applies because “Whakapapa” is considered “an indivisible connection to the physical gene” Therefore, it is crucial to ensure that proper cultural agreements are respected. For Maori people, the abuse of this privacy and rich information is of great interest. Although the whakapapa information may be unveiled to enlightened confidence, the information may be collected in a database that other people have access to. While most health professionals are embracing the technological advances in data storage, this could be an area for further investigation, so confidential information about customer whakapapa can not be disclosed to others.In addition, it may be helpful to find out if a client is suitable for storing whakapapa information in a manner that may be disclosed to other people. To solve these problems, the Maori Code of Ethics has been proposed. The Maori Code of Ethics prevents “the management or manipulation of information or informer. References: ?”Mihimihi/Pepeha”.?Maori at Otago. University of Otago. Retrieved?3 May?2017. Jump up^?Barlow, C. (1994).?Tikanga whakaaro: key concepts in Mäori culture. Auckland, New Zealand: Oxford University Press. Jump up^?Barlow, C. (1994).?Tikanga whakaaro: key concepts in Mäori culture. Auckland, New Zealand: Oxford University Press. Jump up^?Russell, K. (2004).?Hui: A hui to discuss how to create and maintain a relationship with M?ori organisations. Dunedin, New Zealand: Department of Community and Family Studies, University of Otago. Jump up^?Glover, M. (2002).?Kaupapa M?ori health research methodology: a literature review and commentary on the use of a kaupapa M?ori approach within a doctoral study of M?ori smoking cessation. Applied Behavioural Science, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. Jump up^?Russell, K. (2004).?Hui: A hui to discuss how to create and maintain a relationship with M?ori organisations. Dunedin, New Zealand: Department of Community and Family Studies, University of Otago. Jump up^?Glover, M. (2002).?Kaupapa M?ori health research methodology: a literature review and commentary on the use of a kaupapa M?ori approach within a doctoral study of M?ori smoking cessation. Applied Behavioural Science, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. Jump up^?Glover, M. (2002).?Kaupapa M?ori health research methodology: a literature review and commentary on the use of a kaupapa M?ori approach within a doctoral study of M?ori smoking cessation. Applied Behavioural Science, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. Jump up^?Mead (1995) as cited in Glover, M. (2002).?Kaupapa M?ori health research methodology: a literature review and commentary on the use of a kaupapa M?ori approach within a doctoral study of M?ori smoking cessation. Applied Behavioural Science, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. Jump up^?Russell, K. (2004).?Hui: A hui to discuss how to create and maintain a relationship with M?ori organisations. Dunedin, New Zealand: Department of Community and Family Studies, University of Otago. Jump up^?Pomare (1992) as cited in Glover, M. (2002).?Kaupapa M?ori health research methodology: a literature review and commentary on the use of a kaupapa M?ori approach within a doctoral study of M?ori smoking cessation. Applied Behavioural Science, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. Jump up^?Te Awekotuku (1991, p. 13) as cited in Glover, M. (2002).?Kaupapa M?ori health research methodology: a literature review and commentary on the use of a kaupapa M?ori approach within a doctoral study of M?ori smoking cessation. Applied Behavioural Science, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.  Kaitiakitanga Kaitiakitanga is called guardianship or protection. The basic meaning of “tiaki” is protection, but depending on the context in which it is used, it also means preservation, preservation, conservation, protection and surveillance. kaitiaki is a guardian, guardian, custodian, administrator or protector. The addition of “tanga” means protection, protection and protection. Kaitaikitanga is based on the traditional Maori worldview, which includes the protection, supply and sustainability of the environment. This is about protecting the future. Maori world view The traditional concepts of kaitiakitanga include the spiritual realm, the deep relationship in humans and the natural world. A kaitiaki is also described as the guardian of a tribe and may be a spiritual one, such as those left behind by ancestors who left behind and protected the wahi tapu. There are many representatives kaitiaki, but the most common are animals, birds, insects and fish – including freshwater fish. In many cases, taniwha is the guardian of a waterway or a particular area whose role is to protect. To understand this world, humans must understand the relationship between them and the environment in which they live. Man is part of the environment – not better than it. The condition or health of people and the environment is complicated. The phrase “I am a river, a river is me” illustrates the relationship between man and the environment. So, if a river is polluted, then there is something wrong with that person (and vice versa). The assistant or kaitiaki’s character is called kaitiakitanga. Kaitiakitanga involves the protection or custody of the creatures in Papat??nuku and her body. Maori believes that those who know the time should be held accountable. This is tangata whenua (person of the land). Tangata has authority somewhere because of his relationship with his ancestors. APA Reference: https://www.sciencelearn.org.nz Whanaungatanga The introduction and mihimihi (Maori process to make the exchange of practice Support for interactive information) It is important to establish meaningful relationships with Maori wh?nau, need to be included practitioners practice. This in turn will strengthen Practitioners can get relevant and meaningful information from M?ori clients. This means taking a moment to ask where this person comes from or what are the important things about them Connected to. This also means that this information is rewarding; that is, health professionals too Where do the shares come from? For further help, participate in Maori culture. Responsiveness training may be helpful. Often, the lack of engagement with service and margin clients can be traced back to lacking Meaningful contact and trust between health professionals and clients.There are other possible reasons for lack of service, for example Access, fees and transportation. A Wh?nauOra Navigator may be able to identify these problems and they have skills in Whakawh?naungatanga. However, for the navigator to see this whanau ,  Health professionals need the consent of the client / wh?nau. APA Reference: http://www.centralpho.org.nz Manaakitanga The concept of manaakitanga covers a series of meanings in the traditional sense, with a focus on ensuring that the mana of both parties is upheld. In this regard, it relates to the concept of cultural and social responsibility  and respect for human . Manaakitanga’s minimum standards recognize one’s inherent dignity and the responsible person must treat others in a caring manner. Protect and take care of the people and recognize the responsibility of culturally sensitive issues. In this regard, it includes obtaining appropriate advice (eg Kaum?tua, advocate) and respecting the notion of privacy and confidentiality when individualized autonomous concepts are eliminated, the concepts of privacy and secrecy change. Information sharing provides support and transparency and accountability among community members. While acknowledging the appropriateness of privacy and confidentiality to protect the detrimental impact of information disclosure, in many cases the level of confidentiality can be negotiated with communities and participants. This may only involve the participants agreeing to be nominated as part of the study and giving them the opportunity to delete or cancel certain opinions in the final report. Manaakitanga is entirely in the context of the relationship. Here mana akiaki empowers partners to improve the quality of each other’s trust and trust (whakapono) level. Extending beyond cultural security, mhahaki recognizes the importance of recognition of spiritual integrity , Maori philosophy and may include the whakaw?tea process in the research project. APA Reference: https://www.fmhs.auckland.ac.nz/assets/fmhs/faculty/tkhm/docs/teara.doc                                                    Task 1.3                First Principles           Key concepts      Development     Maintenance   Whanau in this context                         refers to: A community of extended families or related families living in the same area.   Whanaugatanga in this context refers to: Relationship of people living in the land  It develops a M?ori Multiple Relationships – A Method of Interaction Communicate with wh?nau and recognize different roles and responsibility within wh?nau structure.  Taking part in family rituals and keep healthy relation with others.  Whenua in this context refers to: ‘Land and Placenta’   Whakapapa(Genealogy) in this context refers to: A classification framework that links all living, inanimate, known and unknown phenomena on land and in the spiritual world. So Whakapapa binds everything. Develop knowledge, Teaching rights and responsibilities by individuals often receiving their name, identity, belonging, turangawaewae (place to stand their ancestral land)  Practice various techniques to take care of land and learn.   Tinana in this context refers to: Physical health of an individual  Kaitiakitanga in this context refers to: Guardianship and Protection   Develop the physical module of Maoris through  physical exercise. Taking care of one’s body by doing regular physical activities Hinengaro in this context refers to: Thoughts and feelings and also known as Mental health. Manaakitanga in this context refers to: Hospitality,caring for the environment,treating people with respect   Develops the Communication skills of the people living in society to communicate with each others and share their feelings. Keeping positive thoughts and have a kind attitude to others.  Wairua in this context refers to: Spiritual health of well being  Whanaugatanga in this context refers to: Relationship of people living in the land  Develop relationships, relate well socially, communicate. Remembering the ancestors on special occassion and keeping them in prayers     

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