The believes that Juliet doesn’t know the world

 The father-daughter relationship between Lord Capulet and Juliet displays the patriarchy, and sexism of their time. It is noticeable how Romeo does not grapple with his parents like Juliet. She was not the typical daughter of her time as she displayed a rebellious attitude towards her father, and made her own choices and decisions which was rare in her society. This drives Juliet to her final actions.In Act 1 Scene 2, Paris and Lord Capulet hold a conversation regarding the proposed marriage of Paris and Juliet, Capulet’s daughter. In this conversation, Lord Capulet displays a lot of affection for his daughter and demonstrates how much he cares for her. “My child is yet a stranger to the world” indicates Capulet attempting to emphasise Juliet’s age. He believes that Juliet doesn’t know the world well enough to make a serious commitment to someone.

Capulet then adds that it’s best that Juliet let a “few more summers wither in her pride” telling the audience that she should enjoy her youthful years without being rushed into marriage. Capulet feels that only when she is older will she be “ripe to be a bride”. Through these quotes, Shakespeare seeks to condemn this practice of marrying daughters off so young, which was an accepted practice at the time. Capulet’s refusal of the marriage leads to Paris’ becoming impatient. He says, “Younger than she are happy mothers made,” alluding to the fact that some girls are married off and have even given birth before reaching Juliet’s age. A majority of Shakespeare’s writing contains metaphors to describe Juliet’s situation to other examples. The language used throughout the beginning of the play displays Capulet as a protective father.

Best services for writing your paper according to Trustpilot

Premium Partner
From $18.00 per page
4,8 / 5
4,80
Writers Experience
4,80
Delivery
4,90
Support
4,70
Price
Recommended Service
From $13.90 per page
4,6 / 5
4,70
Writers Experience
4,70
Delivery
4,60
Support
4,60
Price
From $20.00 per page
4,5 / 5
4,80
Writers Experience
4,50
Delivery
4,40
Support
4,10
Price
* All Partners were chosen among 50+ writing services by our Customer Satisfaction Team

Dramatic irony is used throughout the play to drive the tension in the relationship between Capulet and Juliet. The technique is used between Juliet and Capulet, his protection over Juliet creates a barrier between Romeo and Juliet’s love. Juliet is marrying Romeo leaving Capulet completely unaware, however, the audience knows this. This creates dramatic irony. The fact that Romeo is a Montague drives the tension throughout the play. Juliet has insanely disobeyed her father which made the audience feel on edge, as we know a shift in dynamics will come.

Juliets decisions to disobey her father displays her as an independent, strong girl who is not afraid to make her own decisions. Shakespeare demonstrates her bravery through Juliet disobeying her father, adding great drama and tension to the play. This is also driven by the amount of time that Juliet intends to hide these secrets.Act 3 Scene 5 brings a major shift in dynamics. Prior to this scene, the play has been very romantic and happy.

However, Juliet’s secrets are no longer hidden and creates a lot of drama in Capulets relationship with his daughter. Juliet has shown a lot of honesty to Capulet which took a turn for the worse, and Juliet’s age has started to affect her attitude. Again, Juliet is rebelling against the patriarchal normality of her society.When Juliet confesses to Capulet that she can’t marry Paris, Capulet’s true colours are shown. He proves his anger through harsh comments and insults which are the opposite way to how he felt about Juliet earlier in the play. Capulet denominates Juliet a “disobedient wretch” simply for her not marrying Paris and giving him what he hopes for. This is an overreaction which has now exposed Capulet as a selfish, thoughtless person. When he’s around Juliet he states his “fingers itch” which informs the audience that his frustration is tempting him to beat Juliet.

He then continues that he had a “curse in having her”. By creating this major alteration in dynamics, the audience will feel much further involved in the play.During Act 3 Scene 5, Juliet love for Romeo leads to her becoming selfless and continuously putting him first. Previously in the play, Juliet had always come to the Nurse for advice, however, she has now begun to isolate herself from her family and friends. The Nurse has been trying to convince Juliet that the proposed marriage between her and Paris is a great idea, and Romeo doesn’t compare to him. However, Juliet’s affection for Romeo has influenced her into not wanting any other man. Throughout this scene, Shakespeare intends to demonstrate the strong power of love.

During the play, Juliet’s love for Romeo has matured her greatly and gave her great independence. Her dedication to Romeo is putting a great majority of her life at risk to be with him. Juliet turns to Friar Laurence for help, and he advises her to take a sleeping potion and to fake her own death. She is displaying a great amount of selflessness by jeopardizing everything for Romeo. Shakespeare displays how love can transform your way of thinking.

Lord Capulet and Lady Capulet find Juliets ‘dead’ body, and Lord Capulet is in tremendous shock. “O heaven, O wife look how our daughter bleeds”. He first refers to Juliet as “Our daughter” but then changes it to ‘My daughter”. I feel that Shakespeare did this to show how Juliet’s ‘death’ has come to Lord Capulets consciousness that he’s lost the most valuable person in his life and also to show that maybe Lord Capulet is more devastated than Lady Capulet. This shows the amount of love and warmth in the father-daughter relationship. Juliet lying dead before them may bring back great regrets for Lord Capulet as he had previously greatly insulted and threatened his daughter for a selfish reason.

Shakespeare shows his great love for his daughter by using a significant turn around in how he speaks and feels about his daughter. Juliet’s death ends the feud between the Montague’s and the Capulet’s, meaning that Juliet held the power through the entire play, however, the audience and Juliet were unaware. This also tells us that Juliet drove the storyline and her options depicted what happened.